Graduate Handbook

Table of Contents

General

The Division of Music History, Theory, and Ethnomusicology is a diverse and distinguished community of musician-scholars united by a love of music, dedicated to the highest standards of academic integrity, and committed to meeting your educational needs and those of the larger community with exceptional teaching, scholarship, and musical activity.

The Graduate Handbook is an official College of Music publication that articulates policies and procedures associated with the MA and PhD in Music with concentrations in musicology, music theory, and ethnomusicology. It supplements the degree requirements codified in the UNT Graduate Catalog.

Graduate Placement Exams (GPE) and Review Courses

With few exceptions, incoming graduate students must take the Graduate Placement Exams (GPE) during orientation of their first semester. Review courses assigned due to the results of the GPE do not count towards your degree and must be taken in the first semester in which they are available. The assignment of review courses students will not exceed six hours of music history and two hours of music theory. A grade of B or better must be earned in each course assigned as a review course. The Graduate Studies Website provides more information.

Transcript Evaluations and Leveling Courses

Transcript evaluations are conducted by the area coordinator, who evaluates an applicant’s prior transcript(s). The assignment of leveling courses based on the transcript evaluation will be communicated to the applicant through email before they matriculate. Students must enroll in leveling courses in the first semester in which these courses are available.

Introduction to Research in Music

All master’s students are required to take MUMH 5010 (Introduction to Research in Music) as part of their degree. All doctoral students are required to take MUMH 5010 if they have not taken the course (or its equivalent) at the master’s level. Doctoral students who are required to take MUMH must do so no later than the second semester of study. Hours earned do not count towards the PhD.

Faculty Mentor

The area coordinator will assign a faculty mentor to each student upon matriculation. This mentor will assist the student in choosing courses and in planning a concrete way to fulfill degree requirements. The role of faculty mentor is distinct from that of major professor, who chairs the student's advisory committee and advises the MA thesis or PhD dissertation.

Planning the First Semester

During orientation and the week before classes, incoming students will plan their course schedule for the fall semester in consultation with their faculty mentor and the Senior Graduate Academic Counselor, Dr. Colleen Conlon. Incoming students should meet with both of them before finalizing your course schedule for the first semester. Before meeting with them, however, they should familiarize themselves with this Graduate Handbook, the Graduate Catalog, and the UNT Schedule of Classes. Graduate-level courses begin with 5xxx or 6xxx. Remember to register with the 4- or 5-digit class number, not the course prefix and catalog number.

The Degree Plan

Students should consult with their faculty mentor as they prepare a tentative plan to meet the requirements associated with their degree. Students must submit the degree plan, approved by the faculty mentor and (if applicable) the related-field professor to the College of Music Graduate Studies Office by the completion of twelve hours of study (usually at the end of the student’s first year). All changes to the degree plan must be submitted in writing on the Graduate Degree Plan Change Form and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. Degree requirements are determined by the Graduate Catalog in force at the time the degree plan is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. Degree plans may not be filed in the term/semester a student plans to graduate.

Degree Plans:

Degree Progress and Academic Dismissal Policy

Students must maintain satisfactory progress towards their degree and are subject to university policies regarding academic probation and suspension. In addition, they will be subject to dismissal from the program if one or more of the following conditions apply:

  1. If the student receives one grade of a C or lower in two consecutive semesters.
  2. If the student receives two grades of a C or lower in a single semester.
  3. If the student receives a grade of NPR for thesis or dissertation hours in two consecutive semesters.

In cases where one or more of these conditions apply, students will typically be removed from their program upon the recommendation of the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the division chair and major professor. Students may appeal this decision by contacting the College of Music Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Professional Expectation Policy

The UNT College of Music expects graduate students in music to be committed to their degree and to follow the UNT Code of Student Conduct (University Policy Manual, section 07. 012). Success in a graduate program requires students not only to meet minimum academic standards but also to be active contributors to the artistic and scholarly community of the College of Music. Hence, students must exhibit professional behavior, which includes (but is not limited to): 1) attending classes and meetings (including seminars, masterclasses, and departmentals); 2) meeting area, division, college, and university deadlines; and 3) maintaining respectful interactions with all members of the UNT community. Students are also expected to adhere to professional standards as outlined in division/area handbooks. In cases where there is substantial evidence of unprofessional behavior, students will be removed from their program upon the recommendation of the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the division chair and major professor. Students may appeal this decision by contacting the College of Music Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Lecture Series

Students must attend all lectures presented in the Music History, Theory, and Ethnomusicology Lecture Series during each long semester of full-time enrollment (9 hours).

Graduate Student Organizations

Students in all three concentrations are encouraged to join and to attend the regularly scheduled meetings of the division's graduate student associations: GAMuT (The Graduate Association of Musicologists and Theorists) and SSENT (The Student Society for Ethnomusicology in North Texas).

Teaching Assistantships and Fellowships

Teaching assistantships and fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis and according to the policies and procedures outlined in the UNT College of Music Faculty Handbook, section 5.6. A TA or TF must be enrolled in nine graduate hours unless they have achieved candidacy, in which case they must be enrolled in three graduate hours. Assuming they perform satisfactorily as a TA and/or TF and make progress toward their degrees, master's students can expect two years of funding and doctoral students may expect three years. Appointments may exceed these time limits if there is a demonstrated instructional need or there are extenuating circumstances in a particular student's academic status.

Teaching Assistantships and Fellowships in Music History

Teaching assistantships in music history are normally offered at the time of admission. Prospective or current students interested in applying for an assistantship should contact the area coordinator. Teaching fellowships in music history are offered only to doctoral students who have completed coursework and passed their qualifying exams (major and related-field). 

Teaching Fellowships in Music Theory

Teaching Fellows (TFs) in Music Theory are a select group of graduate students who must pass an audition and who teach courses from within the undergraduate curriculum. This includes primarily aural skills courses (covering sight singing and rhythm reading, dictation, and keyboard applications) and sometimes theory courses (covering fundamentals, form analysis, and counterpoint). 

All music theory TFs work with theory faculty members in charge of core courses. TFs typically teach two classes that meet three times a week or three classes that meet two times a week, as well as participate in weekly staff meetings for their course. TFs also assist in proctoring and grading entrance exams during the week before classes begin. A general training session is provided for all TFs before each semester. Teaching Fellow positions are offered either as 50% (20 hours per week) or 25% (10 hours per week). Positions that are 50% FTE are considered full-time and include benefits and in-state tuition. Stipends for TF/TAs are based on FTE and progress toward the degree.

All UNT graduate students who are currently enrolled may audition for a music theory TF position. These auditions are scheduled through the area, through the process described below. Applicants for graduate study may also be invited to apply. The audition includes an evaluation of the candidate's own skills in the areas mentioned in the first paragraph above, a discussion of any prior teaching experience, and an evaluation of the candidate's ability to explain musical materials clearly and correctly.

The audition is in three parts: sightsinging, aural skills, and keyboard sightreading/analysis as enumerated below. Once you have carefully reviewed all this information, if you feel that you are qualified to apply for a Teaching Fellow position in Music Theory and wish to do so, email to the area coordinator of music theory.

1. Sightsinging

You will be asked to sing a tonal melody of moderate difficulty. Two melodies comparable to those used are shown below. You may sing using any system, including solfége or numbers, or you may use a neutral syllable. The melodies should be sung at steady tempo, with few errors, and without losing the tonic key. Applicants should also be able to explain how to help students through difficult passages.

Example 1:

Example 2:

2. Aural Skills

A. Intervals and chords. Applicants will be asked to identify a series of intervals and chords played on the piano. Intervals are identified by quality and size (e.g., m10, P5), while chords are identified by quality and inversion (e.g., “major, root position”; “major-minor six-five” or “dominant six-five”). Applicants should be able to correctly identify most of the items played.

B. Harmonic progression. Applicants will be played a tonal chord progression and asked to provide a harmonic analysis of the chords. The progression will include some chromaticism. Two or three hearings are permitted. Successful applicants should be able to quickly and accurately identify most or all of the chords.

Sample progression:

3. Keyboard Sight-reading and Score Analysis

Keyboard. Good functional keyboard skills are important for effective classroom work. Applicants should therefore be prepared to sight-read at the keyboard an easy to moderately difficult musical example, such as a sonatina by Haydn or Beethoven, a waltz by Schubert, or a mazurka by Chopin. Below is a representative score. Those auditioning should be able to play the piece accurately, with a steady pulse. For excerpts with fast tempo markings, a performance at a slower tempo generally is permitted.
Sample score​

Score analysis. The candidate will be asked to discuss the same musical score. The applicant should be able to discuss the musical materials with a fair degree of sophistication. Questions may be asked about such things as key and changes of key, chord progressions, non-chord tones, rhythmic/melodic motives, phrase structure, possible large-scale form, and so on. The applicant will also be asked to make a few comments about possible composer, the type of piece, and a possible year of composition.

Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines

Scope and Purpose of the Thesis and Dissertation

The master's thesis should be regarded as a project of research and writing that will demonstrate the student's synthesis of material and application of concepts covered in coursework to a document of no more than eighty pages.

The doctoral dissertation, in contrast, is a lengthier document that results from a more extended period of research and writing and that often entails application of knowledge to a new or previously uncharted area of scholarship or the use of innovative methodology.

Academic Integrity

Students must submit their own work. Students are not authorized to use outside editorial services in the writing of the thesis or dissertation proposal as well as the thesis or dissertation itself.

Master's Thesis Hours Enrollment

Students may enroll in thesis hours once they are in their final semester of coursework and have identified a faculty member who agrees to serve as major professor. The proposal must be completed within the semester in which the student first enrolls in thesis hours; the thesis itself must be defended within two semesters after the semester in which the proposal is accepted. Extensions will be considered only through petition to GADCom and with the support of the major professor.

Dissertation Hours Enrollment

Students may enroll for dissertation hours after the qualifying exams have been completed. The proposal must be completed within two semesters after the student first enrolls in dissertation hours; the dissertation document itself must be defended within three years after the proposal is accepted. Extensions will be considered only through petition to GADCom and with the support of the major professor.

Requirements of Thesis and Dissertation Proposals

Students usually find that crafting the thesis or dissertation proposal is a lengthy process that requires repeated consultation with the major professor and other committee members. Be sure to plan ahead.

The thesis and dissertation proposals must:

  1. Present a clear thesis statement that (a) formulates a main idea; (b) specifies the subordinate elements of this idea; (c) indicates how these subordinate elements relate to one another and to your main idea; (d) indicates the methodologies that you plan to use.

  2. Present a review of the literature that identifies all significant publications relevant to the topic and explains how the argument of the thesis or dissertation relates to the arguments of the publications. Students should consult with the faculty advisor for the meaning of "all" and "significant" as appropriate to the proposal.

  3. Describe the research tasks to be accomplished, demonstrate their feasibility (including access to sources, which may include documents, archives, field research sites, interview subjects, or copyright clearances), and present a timeline for their completion.

  4. Present a provisional outline of the complete thesis or dissertation as an appendix. The outline should show the estimated length of each chapter.

  5. Show competent use of a citation format in current use in musical scholarship. Suggested formats are the humanities style (footnotes and bibliography) for proposals in musicology and theory, and the author-date system for proposals in ethnomusicology. Consult The Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.) and its online guide Chicago Manual of Style for models.

  6. Include a list of references and sources with full citations. The list of references should distinguish between types of sources (primary, secondary, etc.) as appropriate to the topic.

  7. Conform to a maximum length: The main body of text, not counting references, appendices, or musical examples, must be no more than ten double-spaced pages (master's theses) or twenty double-spaced pages (for doctoral dissertations). Proposals must adhere to a standard format: twelve-point type, one-inch margins, black ink, and double spacing.

Submission of Thesis and Dissertation Proposals

MA thesis proposals must be submitted to the area coordinator along with the signed MA Thesis Approval Form, which certifies that all members of the advisory committee have reviewed and approved the proposal.

PhD dissertation proposals must be submitted to the Graduate Studies Office via Canvas and will be forwarded to the Graduate Academic Degree Committee (GADCom) by the end of the eleventh week of each long semester. Proposals must be accompanied by the signed PhD Dissertation Approval Form, which certifies that all members of the advisory committee have reviewed and approved the proposal. GADCom membership for Spring 2019 is: Peter Mondelli (chair), Vivek Virani, Stephen Slottow, Bernardo Illari, and David Bard-Schwarz.

Suggested Resources

The Research Process
Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. 2008. The Craft of Research. 3rd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.
Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. 7th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Writing About Music
Wingell, Richard J. Writing about Music: An Introductory Guide. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2008.
Wingell, Richard J., and Silvia Herzog. 2000. Introduction to Research in Music. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

Clear writing
Williams, Joseph M. Toward Clarity and Grace. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.
Bailey, Stephen. 2011. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. New York: Routledge. Paltridge, Brian, and Sue Starfield.
Thesis and Dissertation Writing in a Second Language: A Handbook for Supervisors. New York: Routledge, 2007

Style
The Chicago Manual of Style. 2003. 16th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Musicology

MA in Music (Concentration in Musicology)

Course Requirements

  Common Core (15 hours)
 
MUMH 5010 - Introduction to Research in Music
MUGC 5950 - Master's Thesis (6 hours)
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology
3 hours
selected from:
MUTH 5355 - Analytical Techniques I (Ars Antiqua–1700)
MUTH 5360 - Analytical Techniques II (1700–1900)
MUTH 5370 - Analytical Techniques III (Post 1900)
  Concentration in Musicology (15 hours)
 
MUMH 5020 - Introduction to Musicology
6 hours
selected from:
MUMH 5110 - History of Opera
MUMH 5331 - Western Music History, 750–1400
MUMH 5332 - Western Music History, 1400–1600
MUMH 5333 - Western Music History, 1600–1700
MUMH 5341 - Western Music History, 1700–1800
MUMH 5342 - Western Music History, 1800–1900
MUMH 5343 - Western Music History, 1900 to the Present
MUMH 5430 - Music in Latin America
MUMH 5440 - Music in the United States
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology
and others with the permission of the area coordinator
  6 hours of electives in music (non-MUMH)

 

Language Requirement

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of one major Western European language other than English. Language exams will be prepared and graded by two faculty members, and will be administered once every semester as the need arises. The exams in any language will consist of two parts, both of which will require students to work with excerpts from texts that have to do with music.  Students must write their answers by hand and may use whatever dictionaries they find appropriate. Part 1 will require students to translate a short excerpt from an older document, possibly from a musical treatise, dictionary, or encyclopedia, and almost certainly printed using archaic fonts. Part 2 will require students to read and understand a longer excerpt from a recent document, most likely a scholarly article; rather than translating the excerpt, students will have to answer questions that test their comprehensive of it.  Students will receive the documents one at a time and will be allowed one and a half hours to complete each part.  Parts 1 and 2 will be graded separately on a pass/fail basis; it is therefore possible to pass one part but fail the other. Students may retake language examinations as many times as desired without penalty. If a student passes one part of the examination in a given language but fails the other part, he or she need only retake the failed part.

Thesis Phase

The length and scope of the thesis will vary depending on the chosen topic and the professional goals of the student. The thesis must comprise a minimum of 7,500 words (excluding front matter, bibliography, footnotes, and appendices).

By the final semester of coursework, the student will officially request a member from the area to serve as major professor, register for thesis hours with that professor, and put together an advisory committee. The student must submit the Committee Designation Form with the appropriate signatures to the Graduate Studies Office. This committee will oversee the writing of the student’s thesis. This committee comprises a minimum of three faculty members including the major professor. The composition of the committee can be revised at any time by means of the same form.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass an oral defense of the thesis conducted by the advisory committee. The oral defense may be scheduled no sooner than one month after a complete draft of the thesis has been submitted to the major professor. It may occur only if the major professor has approved the draft. The examination may be taken no more than three times. Following the approval of the thesis by the entire committee at the defense, the thesis must be submitted to the College of Music Graduate Studies Office no less than two weeks prior to the Toulouse Graduate School submission deadline.

 

MA in Music (Concentration in Musicology, Emphasis in Early Music Performance)

Course Requirements

  Common Core (15 hours)
 
MUMH 5010 - Introduction to Research in Music
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology
MUGC 5950 - Master's Thesis (6 hours)
3 hours
selected from:
MUTH 5355 - Analytical Techniques I (Ars Antiqua–1700)
MUTH 5360 - Analytical Techniques II (1700–1900)
MUTH 5370 - Analytical Techniques III (Post 1900)
  Concentration in Musicology (17 hours)
 
MUMH 5020 - Introduction to Musicology
MUMH 5610 - Ornamentation and Improvisation, 1500-1800
MUEN 5530 - Early Music Ensembles (2 hours)
MUAC 5332 - Early Instruments (2 hours, 2 semesters at concentration level)
MUAG 5701 - Master's Recital (1 hour)
6 hours
selected from:
MUMH 5331 - Western Music History, 750–1400 (3 hours)
MUMH 5332 - Western Music History, 1400–1600 (3 hours)
MUMH 5333 - Western Music History, 1600–1700 (3 hours)
MUMH 5341 - Western Music History, 1700–1800 (3 hours)
MUMH 5342 - Western Music History, 1800–1900 (3 hours)
MUMH 5430 - Music in Latin America (3 hours)

Language Requirement

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of one major Western European language other than English. Language exams will be prepared and graded by two faculty members, and will be administered once every semester as the need arises. The exams in any language will consist of two parts, both of which will require students to work with excerpts from texts that have to do with music. Students must write their answers by hand and may use whatever dictionaries they find appropriate. Part 1 will require students to translate a short excerpt from an older document, possibly from a musical treatise, dictionary, or encyclopedia, and almost certainly printed using archaic fonts. Part 2 will require students to read and understand a longer excerpt from a recent document, most likely a scholarly article; rather than translating the excerpt, students will have to answer questions that test their comprehensive of it. Students will receive the documents one at a time and will be allowed one and a half hours to complete each part.  Parts 1 and 2 will be graded separately on a pass/fail basis; it is therefore possible to pass one part but fail the other. Students may retake language examinations as many times as desired without penalty. If a student passes one part of the examination in a given language but fails the other part, he or she need only retake the failed part.

Thesis Phase

The thesis project includes a required recital, organized around a topic, and a related research paper. The length and scope of the thesis will vary depending on the chosen topic and the professional goals of the student. The thesis must comprise a minimum of 7,500 words (excluding front matter, bibliography, footnotes, and appendices).

By the final semester of coursework, the student will officially request a member from the area to serve as major professor, register for thesis hours with that professor, and put together an advisory committee. The student must submit the Committee Designation Form with the appropriate signatures to the Graduate Studies Office. This committee will oversee the writing of the student’s thesis. This committee comprises a minimum of three faculty members including the major professor. The composition of the committee can be revised at any time by means of the same form.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass an oral defense of the thesis conducted by the advisory committee. The oral defense may be scheduled no sooner than one month after a complete draft of the thesis has been submitted to the major professor. It may occur only if the major professor has approved the draft. The examination may be taken no more than three times. Following the approval of the thesis by the entire committee at the defense, the thesis must be submitted to the College of Music Graduate Studies Office no less than two weeks prior to the Toulouse Graduate School submission deadline.

PhD (Concentration in Music History)

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree with a Major in Music and Concentration in Musicology requires a minimum of ninety semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. Of these ninety hours, at least sixty must be taken at UNT. Thirty hours may be transferred from other institutions with the approval of the coordinator of music history. A master's degree from an accredited institution usually is accepted in lieu of the first thirty hours.

The minimum residence requirement for the doctoral program consists of two consecutive long semesters (fall and the following spring, or spring and the following fall) with a minimum load of nine hours during each term. Students are expected to achieve candidacy (i.e. complete all requirements besides the dissertation proposal and dissertation) by the end of their sixth long semester. Students are expected to graduate by the end of their tenth long semester.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree cannot be earned by routine work alone, regardless of accuracy or amount. The degree will be conferred on the basis of mastery of the field of music as a whole and of proven ability to plan and carry out an original investigation with distinction.

Course Requirements

  Common Core (36 hours)
 
3 hours of MUMH 6XXX
3 hours of MUET 6XXX
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology
MUGC 6950 - Doctoral Dissertation (12 hours)
Related/Minor Field (12 hours)
Electives (3 hours)
Must also have completed Master’s core requirement (15 hours)
  Concentration in Musicology (24 hours)
  MUEN 5xxx (3 hours)
18 hours
selected from:
MUMH 6000 - Notation of Polyphonic Music, 1200–1500
MUMH 6720 - Medieval Music
MUMH 6730 - Renaissance Music
MUMH 6740 - Baroque Music
MUMH 6750 - Classical Music
MUMH 6760 - Music of the Romantic Era
MUMH 6770 - Music of the Twentieth Century
MUMH 6080 - Chamber Music
MUMH 6160 - Major Composers
MUTH 6660 - History of Music Theory I
MUTH 6670 - History of Music Theory II
MUTH 6700 - Analytical Systems I (1700–1900)
MUTH 6710 - Analytical Systems II (Post 1900)

Qualifying Exams

Timing

Exams will be administered once a year, during the week that precedes the beginning of classes in the fall; the area coordinator will announce the exact dates by no later than 1 August. Students must fulfill all leveling- and review-course assignments before attempting the qualifying exams.

Format

The written components will consist of a two-hour score-identification exam and three two-hour essays, thus eight hours of written exams altogether. All exams must be handwritten; accommodation will be made for special needs. A ninety-minute oral exam administered by the full area faculty will follow several days later.

Score Identification

Students will be asked to discuss in detail features of style, form, and genre in six out of ten musical examples and identify the likely time of composition as precisely as possible. Five of the ten examples will be from before 1750 and the other five from after 1750. Students must choose three from before 1750 and three from after 1750 to identify and discuss.

Essay Questions

In the spring before they are to take the exams, students, in consultation with area faculty members, will select three topics to study over the summer and will compile a bibliography for each. Each topic must concern a body of musical works from a different period of music history: pre-1600, 1600–1800, and 1800–present. After consulting with musicology faculty members, students are to submit their topics to the area by no later than 1 April. Each of the proposed topics must consist of a title, a repertory list, and a bibliography. Topics must be approved by the end of the spring semester.

One purpose of this structure is to focus students’ preparation for the exams; another is to allow them to continue the kind of work that they should already have begun in their seminars and thus to further their development as professionals. Preparing for these exams models the way that musicologists work: this is how we develop projects that turn into articles and books. Of the three questions on the exam, one is likely to require working with one or more scores; another is likely to be a question concerning methodology raised by one of the topics. All three questions will require close engagement with ideas expressed in items on the bibliographies. The musicology faculty as a whole must approve all exam questions. Do not assume that a particular faculty member will write a question because of the courses that he or she teaches.

Oral Examination

The oral exam centers on the student’s essays. Students should consider the oral exam an opportunity not only to expand upon, clarify, or revise their written responses but also to demonstrate their intellectual flexibility, familiarity with the topics and bibliographies, and potential as a teacher and participant in scholarly conversation. Like the written exams, the oral exam should continue a process that has already begun in the seminars.

Grading

Area faculty will grade each of the four components on a pass/fail basis. The written and oral portions of each essay question will be graded together; thus a student cannot pass the written essay question but fail the oral defense of that question, or vice-versa. Students who fail one of the four components of the qualifying exams must re-take and pass it by the end of the fall semester. For the score identification portion, the re-take consists of a new set of scores. For any of the essay portions, the re-take consists of another two-hour exam on a new essay question regarding the same topic—approved by the area faculty—and a half-hour oral exam administered by at least three musicology professors. A student who fails two or more components must retake those parts of the exam the following fall. Students who fail any part of the exams twice will be subject to dismissal from the program.

Proficiencies

The following proficiencies must be demonstrated before submitting a dissertation proposal: knowledge of two foreign languages, research and writing skills, and adequate mastery of a minor or related field. These proficiencies will not be tested when students are taking the qualifying exams. They should be demonstrated by the end of the sixth semester of study and must be demonstrated before the student submits a dissertation proposal. The student is responsible for documenting the demonstration of the proficiencies on the Final Milestones Form.

Language Proficiency

German and a second language subject to the approval of the musicology area is required. Language exams will be prepared and graded by two faculty members, and will be administered once every semester as the need arises. The examinations in any language will consist of two parts, both of which will require students to work with excerpts from texts that have to do with music. Students must write their answers by hand and may use whatever dictionaries they find appropriate. Part 1 will require students to translate a short excerpt from an older document, possibly from a musical treatise, dictionary, or encyclopedia, and almost certainly printed using archaic fonts. Part 2 will require students to read and understand a longer excerpt from a recent document, most likely a scholarly article; rather than translating the excerpt, students will have to answer questions that test their comprehension of it. Students will receive the documents one at a time and will be allowed one and a half hours to complete each part. Parts 1 and 2 will be graded separately on a pass/fail basis; it is therefore possible to pass one part but fail the other. Students may retake language examinations as many times as desired without penalty. If a student passes one part of the examination in a given language but fails the other part, he or she need only retake the failed part.

Proficiency in Research

The student must submit a revised seminar paper to be read and approved by the area faculty.

Proficiency in a Related or Minor Field

To complete a doctorate in musicology, students must demonstrate proficiency in a related or minor field.Requirements for demonstrating proficiency and the administering of any examination will fall under the auspices of the related or minor field area.

The related field (within the College of Music) or minor field (a course of study outside the College of Music) must comprise at least twelve credit hours of study. The course of study and method of evaluation for the related or minor field will be determined by the faculty in that area. If degree credit is to be given for applied music, the student must pass the master's-level entrance audition in performance prior to enrollment for these credit hours. The student who does not pass or take the audition may study applied music, but this credit will not count toward the sixty hours required for the degree.

Dissertation Phase

The culmination of the doctoral work is a dissertation of appropriate scope, quality and originality. After completing thier coursework, passing the qualifying exams, and demonstrating the required proficiencies, students will start working on their dissertation proposals while finishing course work. Once they have finished course work, students will be admitted to candidacy.

The student will officially request a tenure-track or tenured member of the music history faculty to serve as major professor, register for one semester of dissertation hours with that professor, and put together a dissertation committee. The student must fill in the Committee Designation Form, seek the appropriate signatures, and file it with the Office of Graduate Studies. This committee will oversee the writing of the student’s dissertation. This committee is comprised of three to five faculty members, including the major professor, a representative of the student’s minor/related field, and at least one additional member (usually a second music historian). The composition of the committee can be revised at any time by means of the same form.

In communication with the major professor and the committee, the student will select a dissertation topic, write a dissertation proposal and submit it to the Graduate Academic Degrees Committee (GADCom) for approval. Consult the Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines for more information.

If it is deemed necessary, the student may be required to define a broader area of study that sufficiently contextualizes the topic. In this case, the student will compile a bibliography on the broader area and schedule a one-hour oral exam. The student’s committee will oversee the exam, during which the student will answer questions on the literature in his/her area as represented by the bibliography. Upon admission to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous dissertation enrollment (MUGC 6950) each long semester until the dissertation has been completed and accepted by the Dean of the Graduate School. Registration in at least one summer session is required if the student is using university facilities and/or faculty time during that summer session.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass an oral defense of the dissertation. The oral defense may be scheduled no sooner than one month after a complete draft of the dissertation has been submitted to the major professor. It may occur only if the major professor has approved the draft. The examination may be taken no more than three times. Following the approval of the dissertation by the entire committee at the defense, the dissertation must be submitted to the College of Music Graduate Studies Office no less than two weeks prior to the Toulouse Graduate School submission deadline.

Related Field in Musicology (MM)

The related field in musicology requires nine credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements.

9 hours
selected from:
MUMH 5020 - Introduction to Musicology
MUMH 5110 - History of Opera
MUMH 5331 - Western Music History, 750–1400
MUMH 5332 - Western Music History, 1400–1600
MUMH 5333 - Western Music History, 1600–1700
MUMH 5341 - Western Music History, 1700–1800
MUMH 5342 - Western Music History, 1800–1900
MUMH 5343 - Western Music History, 1900 to the Present
MUMH 5430 - Music in Latin America
MUMH 5440 - Music in the United States
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology
MUET 5210 - Seminar in Ethnomusicology
or additional courses with approval of the area coordinator

Related Field in Musicology (DMA or PhD)

Application

Doctoral students wishing to select musicology as related field must submit a formal application. Applications will be reviewed during long semesters only and will consist of three items:

  • a cover letter including contact information
  • a paper that the student wrote for a past music history class (not necessarily at UNT)
  • a personal statement (300-500 words) addressing the student’s musicological interests and goals

These materials must be sent to the area coordinator. Area faculty will then evaluate the application and issue a formal decision of acceptance or rejection. Only once a formal acceptance is officially communicated to the student will he or she be admitted to the related field in musicology.

Course Requirements

The related field in musicology requires twelve credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements.

  MUMH 5020 - Introduction to Musicology
3-6 hours
selected from:
MUMH 5331 - Western Music History, 750–1400
MUMH 5332 - Western Music History, 1400–1600
MUMH 5333 - Western Music History, 1600–1700
MUMH 6720 - Medieval Music
MUMH 6730 - Renaissance Music
MUMH 6740 - Baroque Music
3-6 hours
selected from:
MUMH 5110 - History of Opera
MUMH 5342 - Western Music History, 1800–1900
MUMH 5343 - Western Music History, 1900 to the Present
MUMH 5430 - Music in Latin America
MUMH 5440 - Music in the United States
MUMH 6160 - Major Composers
MUMH 6080 - Chamber Music
MUMH 6750 - Classical Music
MUMH 6760 - Music of the Romantic Era
MUMH 6770 - Music of the Twentieth Century

With the permission of the area coordinator, the final three hours of the related field may also be fulfilled by Teaching Music History, a Special Problems course (MUMH 6900) taught by the instructors of MUMH 3500 or MUMH 3510 during certain semesters. Students interested in this class must contact the area coordinator at registration time.

Related-Field Exam

Well in advance of the exam the student must ask one musicology professor to serve as the related-field professor and another to serve as a second faculty adviser. One will focus on pre-1750 music, another on the post-1750 music. 

The exam will require the student to write three essays. He or she will have one hour to complete each essay. The related-field professor and second faculty advisor will write the questions, grade the written exam, and conduct the oral portion of the exam.

Approximately six weeks before the exam the student will receive two possible topics for each essay. Two days before the exam the related-field professor will communicate to the student which of each pair of possibilities will appear on the exam and provide the student with specific prompts for each essay. The student may bring scores to the exam. The exam is to be handwritten, but the student does not have to write in blue books.

  1. The first essay will be on a topic that concerns methodology. The topic will most likely be taken from MUMH 5020, which is required for the related field. It may also be taken from another course, subject to area approval.
  2. The second part of the exam will require the student to write two essays that focus on central repertory. The student's advisers will assign two pieces from before 1750 and two from after 1750, but, as stated above, the student will write on only one of each pair. Questions for this part of the exam will not necessarily be related to the classes that the student took for related-field credit.

Students will prepare for this part of the exam by acquiring a thorough knowledge of the assigned pieces and the English-language literature on them. The related-field professor and second faculty adviser will be careful to assign pieces on which there is a significant amount of published English-language research.

This written test will be graded on a pass or fail basis by the related-field professor and second faculty adviser. After passing this test, the student must take an oral exam in which he or she will have the opportunity to defend or clarify answers. If the student's degree program does not include an oral stage as part of the qualifying examinations, an oral follow-up dealing solely with the musicology part of the test will be scheduled.

These examinations may be taken no more than three times. All components of the qualifying examinations must be completed within fourteen months.

Updated January 22, 2019

Music Theory

The graduate programs in music theory at the University of North Texas provide advanced instruction in the diverse sub-disciplines currently found in the profession and thus prepare you for a career as college or university theory professor. The curriculum includes: studies in analytical techniques covering the entire history of Western musical practice as well as specialized methodologies such as Schenkerian studies with a strong emphasis on counterpoint, history of music theory, and music theory pedagogy. During your period of study, you are mentored and encouraged to present scholarly papers at local, national, and international conferences and to submit essays to scholarly journals in the field of music theory. The culmination of graduate study in music theory at UNT is a master's thesis (or 2-paper option to be discussed below) or doctoral dissertation.

MA (Concentration in Music Theory)

Course Requirements

Common Core (15 hours)
MUMH 5010 - Introduction to Research in Music
MUGC 5950 - Master's Thesis (6 hours) or
MUGC 5930 - Research Problem in Lieu of Thesis (6 hours)
MUTH 5360 - Analytical Techniques II (1700–1900)
MUTH 5680 - Proseminar in Music Theory
Concentration in Music Theory (21 hours)
MUTH 5080 - Pedagogy of Theory
MUTH 5355 - Analytical Techniques I (Ars Antiqua–1700)
MUTH 5370 - Analytical Techniques III (Post 1900)
MUET 5230 - World Music Analysis
MUTH 5400 - Invertible Counterpoint and Fugue or
MUTH 5470 - Advanced Schenkerian Analysis
MUMH 5xxx or 6xxx (3 hours)
Piano, 2 hours
MUEN or MULB 5xxx (1 hour)

Language Requirement

You must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of one foreign language prior to applying for graduation. The choice of language, other than German or French, must be approved by the music theory area.

Master's Thesis

Before submitting their proposal, graduate students in music theory should consult the Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines for information concerning formatting, content, stylistic suggestions, and submission requirements. Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass a final oral examination (thesis defense) covering the thesis and, if applicable, the field of concentration. The examination may be taken no more than three times.

Two-Paper Option

As an alternative to the thesis requirement in music theory, graduate students may write two research essays. If you choose the two-paper option, you must enroll in MUGC 5930 for two semesters. The Master's Two-Paper Option Proposal Form must be completed and submitted to the Division Chair for approval to begin the process. Each essay must have a different advisor, and will be evaluated by a committee of three faculty members: the advisor of paper #1, who will also serve as the instructor of record and Committee Chair; the advisor of paper #2, and a third faculty member. One essay must be a revised and extended research paper generated in a 5000- or 6000-level music theory class. The other paper may either be from a graduate class or be an independent project. Both papers must be on substantially different topics in the field of music theory. The committee evaluates both essays, determines what revisions or expansions are needed, and determines when they are ready to be defended, at which time the papers are either approved, approved with revisions, or not approved.

PhD (Concentration in Music Theory)

The Doctor of Philosophy degree with a concentration in music theory requires a minimum of ninety semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. A maximum of thirty hours may be transferred from other institutions at the discretion of the area coordinator. Under special circumstances, students may be admitted to the program after completing a bachelor's in music theory. A master's degree from an accredited institution usually is accepted for the first thirty hours. The minimum residence requirement consists of two consecutive long terms/semesters (fall and the following spring, or spring and the following fall) with a minimum load of nine hours in each term or three consecutive long semesters with a minimum of six graduate hours in each term. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree cannot be earned by routine work alone, regardless of accuracy or amount. The degree will be conferred, rather, on the basis of mastery of the field of music as a whole and the proven ability to plan and carry out an original investigation in music theory with distinction. This curriculum provides opportunities for you to engage in study that will prepare you for professional careers in theoretical research and teaching. You are required to engage in considerable research activity in the seminar environment, as well as to develop the pedagogical, communicative, and technological skills necessary to communicate results of that research.

Course Requirements

Common Core (36 hours)
3 hours of MUMH 6XXX
3 hours of MUET 6XXX
MUTH 6680 - Proseminar in Music Theory 
MUGC 6950 - Doctoral Dissertation (12 hours)
Related/Minor Field (12 hours)
Electives (3 hours)
Must also have completed Master’s core requirement (15 hours)
Concentration in Music Theory (24 hours)
MUTH 6660 - History of Music Theory I
MUTH 6670 - History of Music Theory II
MUTH 6680 - Proseminar in Music Theory
MUTH 6700 - Analytical Systems I (1700–1900)
MUTH 6710 - Analytical Systems II (Post 1900)
MUET 5230 - World Music Analysis
Electives, 6 hours

Language Requirement

You must demonstrate proficiency in two languages other than English. One of these languages must be German. The language requirements must be satisfied before you take your qualifying examinations. Credits earned taking foreign languages do not count towards your degree.

Qualifying Exams

When and How Students Should Take the Qualifying Exams
Qualifying examinations are administered during orientation week before the fall and spring semesters. Be prepared to spend three full days on the written examination. Ph.D. students are required to take the Qualifying Examinations no later than the third long semester after they have completed all course and language requirements have been satisfied. Any portions of the Qualifying Examination that are not passed must be retaken in the subsequent long semester. If upon a second try there are still portions that have not been passed, they must be retaken in the following long semester. Students may take any portion of the exam no more than three times.  

For more information, contact the area coordinator. All materials will be provided, monitored, collected and printed out by the area coordinator.

Students may use their own computers for all exams as well as translation dictionaries for the foreign language exam. All work must contain page numbers and must be double-spaced. Students who write any examples or figures on staff paper they provide themselves should be sure to make clear reference to them in their prose. Any score analysis should be similarly labeled and referenced, if it is intended to be considered in the grade.  

Click here to view/download sample questions from past exams.

Description

The examination consists of three written components (Analysis, History and Methodology). Each component includes six hours of examinations subdivided into smaller parts as given below. Each part will be accompanied by specific questions or instructions. All parts of the qualifying examination will be graded by members of the theory faculty. The grade of “pass” or “fail” will be given as a single grade for each of the three components. An added oral examination may be assigned by the graders for borderline grades on any or all components. Each sub-section of the three component examinations may be taken a maximum of three times.

  1. Analysis. Three essays (three hours each). The student is to write three analytical essays, one on a work composed before 1750, one on a work written between 1750-1900, and one after 1900. For each essay the student chooses one of two complete pieces provided. A piano will be provided, but no recordings. The student may engage any analytical approaches deemed appropriate and pertinent. Each of the three essays should demonstrate the student’s understanding of the complete work or movement by addressing various issues in relating the component parts to the whole.
  2. History. Two essays (three hours each)
    1. Repertoire essay: eight score excerpts from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and modern periods (complete shorter pieces, and/or an entire formal section of a larger piece) are provided. The student is to select four of these score excerpts. For each of them, the student is to identify and describe specific features of the score excerpt that may be regarded either as characteristic “signature” gestures of an individual composer or as evidence of a given musical style. Finally, drawing upon these cited features, the student is to surmise a probable date when the work was composed and a possible composer.
    2. Language document essay. One excerpt from a theoretical text in a foreign language is provided. The student writes an essay on the content and context of the text, following any given prompts.  Use of a translation dictionary is permitted, brought by the student.
  3. Methodology.Two essays (two hours each)
    1. History of Theory. The student writes an essay on a given topic/problem/issue in the history of music theory. Some possible topics could be: a theoretical concept, theoretical problems in a specific historical period, the writings of a specific theorist, or specific theoretical terminology.
    2. Theory Pedagogy. The student is to write an essay on a given topic in theory pedagogy. The topic may be related to a pedagogical concept or a case study of a specific teaching situation.

Admission to Candidacy

To be accepted into doctoral candidacy in music theory, you must have completed the following:

  • all course work, including review and leveling courses and a related or minor field of twelve hours
  • the language requirement
  • all qualifying examinations with a grade of "pass"

Dissertation

The culmination of the doctoral work is a dissertation of appropriate scope, quality and originality. The dissertation proposal will be presented to GADCom after successful completion of the qualifying examination. Upon admission to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous dissertation enrollment (MUGC 6950) each long term/semester until the dissertation has been completed and accepted by relevant administrators of the College of Music and Toulouse Graduate School. Registration in at least one summer session is required if you are using university facilities and/or faculty time during that summer session. The final copies of the dissertation must be placed in the hands of your major professor at least two weeks before the scheduled oral examination in any given term/semester. The oral examination will be scheduled after the dissertation has been completed and accepted by your major professor, and before the last day for filing dissertations in the office of the graduate dean, as announced in the academic calendar.

Dissertation Defense

You will defend your completed dissertation before the doctoral committee and any other interested faculty, students, and members of the academic community. The successful defense is indicated by the signatures of all members of the doctoral committee on the Oral Defense Form.

Related Field in Music Theory (MM)

The related field in music theory requires nine credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements.

9 hours
selected from:
MUTH 5080 - Pedagogy of Theory
MUTH 5355 - Analytical Techniques I (Ars Antiqua–1700)
MUTH 5360 - Analytical Techniques II (1700–1900)
MUTH 5370 - Analytical Techniques III (Post 1900)
MUTH 5400 - Invertible Counterpoint and Fugue
MUTH 5470 - Advanced Schenkerian Analysis

Related Field in Music Theory (DMA or PhD)

Application

Doctoral students wishing to select music theory as related field must submit a formal application. Applications will be reviewed during long semesters only and will consist of three items:

  • a cover letter including contact information
  • an analysis paper that the student wrote for a past music theory class (not necessarily at UNT)
  • a personal statement (300-500 words) addressing theoretical/analytical interests and goals

These materials must be sent to the area coordinator. Area faculty will then evaluate the application and issue a formal decision of acceptance or rejection. Only once a formal acceptance is officially communicated to the student will he or she be admitted to the related field in music theory.

Course Requirements

The related field in music theory requires twelve credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements.

12 hours
selected from
MUTH 5080 - Pedagogy of Theory
MUTH 5355 - Analytical Techniques I (Ars Antiqua–1700)
MUTH 5360 - Analytical Techniques II (1700–1900)
MUTH 5370 - Analytical Techniques III (Post 1900)
MUTH 5400 - Invertible Counterpoint and Fugue
MUTH 6680 - Proseminar in Music Theory

Related-Field Exam

The related-field professor will select two pieces representative of the standard repertoire. The pieces may involve original notation; they may be in full score (symphonic movements of moderate length).

The student will write an analytical essay on one of these pieces and should begin with a clear thesis, in which he or she indicates the purpose and the analytical approach of the essay. The essay should continue by addressing (at least briefly) salient large-scale issues of form and structure.

The student may then decide whether to write about large-scale matters, or whether to narrow down their discussion to particularly rich passages. The essay’s analytical discourse must be supported by precise evidence in the form of musical examples, diagrams, and/or sketches. If relevant to the work, the student might address extra musical elements such as word-painting, poetic ideas, narrativity, rhetoric, and aesthetics, being careful to ground such elements firmly in the immediate details of the work at hand. A conclusion should provide a clear overview of the results and significance of the essay’s thesis.

Ethnomusicology

Graduate programs in ethnomusicology at the University of North Texas prepare students for careers both in academia and the public sector. The curriculum includes seminars on current issues in ethnomusicology, courses in ethnographic field methods, area studies, world music analysis, and ensembles (African Music and Movement, Chinese Music Ensemble, Balinese Gamelan, Latin American Percussion Ensemble, South Asian Ensemble, Steel Band).

During your period of study, you are mentored and encouraged to present scholarly papers at local, national, and international conferences and to submit essays to scholarly journals in the field of ethnomusicology. The culmination of graduate study in ethnomusicology at UNT is a master's thesis (or two-paper option) or doctoral dissertation. 

MA (Concentration in Ethnomusicology)

Course Requirements

  Common Core (15 hours)
 
MUET 5030 - Music Cultures of the World
MUET 5230 - World Music Analysis
MUMH 5010 - Introduction to Research in Music
MUGC 5950 - Master's Thesis (6 hours) or
MUGC 5930 - Research Problem in Lieu of Thesis (6 hours)
  Concentration in Ethnomusicology (22 hours)
 
ANTH 5010 - Anthropological Thought and Praxis I (3 hours)
MUET 5210 - Seminar in Ethnomusicology (6 hours)
MUET 5220 – Ethnomusicology Field and Research Methods (3 hours)
MUEN 56xx - Music Ensembles (1 hour)
6 hours
selected from
MUET 5020 - Anthropology of Sound
MUET 5040 - Ethnomusicology Studies Abroad
MUET 5050 - Music of Africa
MUET 5060 - African-American Music
MUET 5070 - Studies in Asian Music
MUET 5080 - Studies in Latin American Music
MUET 5090 - Music of India
3 hours
selected from:
MUJS 5430 - Graduate Review of Jazz History
MUMH 5020 - Introduction to Musicology
MUMH 5430 - Music in Latin America
MUMH 5711 - Seminar in Musicology

Pending approval by the College of Music Graduate Council and Univeristy Graduate Council.

Language Requirement

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of a field language. This test is administered by the Division faculty once every semester. In order to take this test, students should contact the coordinator of ethnomusicology.

Thesis Phase

Around the finalization of course work, the student will officially request a member from the ethnomusicology area to serve as major professor, register for thesis hours with that professor, and put together an advisory committee. The student must fill in the Designation of Advisory Committee Form, seek the appropriate signatures, and file it with the Office of Graduate Studies. This committee will oversee the writing of the student’s thesis. This committee is typically comprised of three faculty members, including the major professor, a representative of the student’s minor/related field, and at least one additional member (usually is a second ethnomusicologist).

The composition of the committee could be revised at any time by means of the same form. In communication with the major professor and the committee, the student will select a thesis topic, write a thesis proposal and submit it to your committee chair for approval by the committee and ethnomusicology faculty in a timely manner. The Thesis and Dissertation Guidelines provide specific guidelines for this process.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass an oral defense of the thesis. This examination will be scheduled after the text has been completed and accepted by the major professor, and before the last day for filing dissertations in the College of Music Graduate Office, as announced in the academic calendar. The examination may be taken no more than three times.

A final version of the complete thesis must be placed in the hands of the major professor no less than a month in advance of the oral examination. A reading copy is due in the College of Music Graduate Office two weeks prior to the Toulouse Graduate School submission deadline.

Two-Paper Option

As an alternative to the thesis requirement in ethnomusicology, graduate students may write two research essays. If you choose the two-paper option, you must enroll in MUGC 5930 for two semesters. The Master's Two-Paper Option Proposal Form must be completed and submitted to the Division Chair for approval to begin the process. Each essay must have a different advisor, and will be evaluated by a committee of three faculty members: the advisor of paper #1, who will also serve as the instructor of record and Committee Chair; the advisor of paper #2, and a third faculty member. One essay must be a revised and extended research paper generated in a 5000- or 6000-level ethnomusicology class. The other paper may either be from a graduate class or be an independent project. Both papers must be on substantially different topics in the field of ethnomusicology. The committee evaluates both essays, determines what revisions or expansions are needed, and determines when they are ready to be defended, at which time the papers are either approved, approved with revisions, or not approved.

PhD (Concentration in Ethnomusicology)

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree with a Major in Music and Concentration in Ethnomusicology requires a minimum of ninety semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. Of these ninety hours, at least sixty must be taken at UNT. Thirty hours may be transferred from other institutions with the approval of the coordinator of ethnomusicology. A master's degree from an accredited institution usually is accepted in lieu of the first thirty hours. The minimum residence requirement for the doctoral program consists of two consecutive long semesters (fall and the following spring, or spring and the following fall) with a minimum load of nine hours during each term.

It should be understood that the Doctor of Philosophy degree cannot be earned by routine work alone, regardless of accuracy or amount. The degree will be conferred on the basis of mastery of the field of ethnomusicology as a whole and of proven ability to plan and carry out original fieldwork, research and writing with distinction.

Course Requirements

Common Core (36 hours)
3 hours of MUMH 6XXX
3 hours of MUET 6XXX
MUTH 6680 - Proseminar in Ethnomusicology 
MUGC 6950 - Doctoral Dissertation (12 hours)
Related/Minor Field (12 hours)
Electives (3 hours)
Must also have completed Master’s core requirement (15 hours)
Concentration in Ethnomusicology (24 hours)
MUET 5020 - Anthropology of Sound
MUET 6010 - Current Issues in Ethnomusicology (12 hours)
MUET 5xxx (6 hours)
World music ensembles from MUET 5xxx (3 hours)

Qualifying Exams

Each doctoral student is required to pass qualifying examinations in his or her major field and is also required to pass qualifying examinations in a minor or related field.

Language Requirement

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge in either two major Western European languages (preferably French and German) other than English, or one major Western European language and a field language. This test is administered by the Division faculty once every semester. In order to take this test, students should contact the Coordinator of Ethnomusicology.

Dissertation Phase

The culmination of the doctoral work is a dissertation of appropriate scope, quality and originality. After passing the qualifying exams, students will start working on their dissertation proposals while finishing course work. Once they have finished course work, students will be admitted to candidacy. The student will officially request a member from the ethnomusicology area to serve as major professor, register for one semester of dissertation hours with that professor, and put together a dissertation committee.

The student must fill in the Designation of Advisory Committee Form, seek the appropriate signatures, and file it with the Office of Graduate Studies. This committee will oversee the writing of the student’s dissertation. This committee is comprised of three to five faculty members, including the major professor, a representative of the student’s minor/related field, and at least one additional member (usually a second ethnomusicologist).

The composition of the committee could be revised at any time by means of the same form. In communication with the major professor and the committee, the student will select a dissertation topic, write a dissertation proposal and submit it to the Graduate Academic Degrees Committee (GADCom) for approval. See Requirements for Thesis and Dissertation Proposals for more information.

If it is deemed necessary, the student may be required to define a broader area of study that sufficiently contextualizes the topic. In this case, the student will compile a bibliography on the broader area and schedule a one-hour oral exam. The student’s committee will oversee the exam, during which the student will answer questions on the literature in his/her area as represented by the bibliography.

Upon admission to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous dissertation enrollment (MUGC 6950) each long semester until the dissertation has been completed and accepted by the Dean of the Graduate School. Registration in at least one summer session is required if the student is using university facilities and/or faculty time during that summer session.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass an oral defense of the dissertation. This examination will be scheduled after the text has been completed and accepted by the major professor and before the last day for filing dissertations in the College of Music Graduate Office, as announced in the Academic Calendar. The examination may be taken no more than three times.

A final version of the complete dissertation must be placed in the hands of the major professor no less than a month in advance of the oral examination. A reading copy is due in the College of Music Graduate Office two weeks prior to the Toulouse Graduate School submission deadline.

Related Field in Ethnomusicology (MM, DMA, and PhD)

Application

Master’s and doctoral students wishing to select ethnomusicology as related field must submit a formal application. Applications will be reviewed during long semesters only and will consist of three items:

  • a cover letter including contact information
  • a paper that demonstrates graduate-level writing competency (not necessarily at UNT)
  • a personal statement (300-500 words) addressing ethnomusicological interests and goals

These materials must be sent to the coordinator via email. Area faculty will then evaluate the application and issue a formal decision of acceptance or rejection. Only once a formal acceptance is officially communicated to the student will he or she be admitted to the related field in ethnomusicology.

Course Requirements (MM)

The related field in ethnomusicology requires nine credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements. Students interested in the related field in ethnomusicology must identify a related-field professor prior to embarking on a program of study.

 
MUET 5030 - Music Cultures of the World
either 6 hours
selected from:
MUET 5220 - Ethnomusicology Field and Research Methods (recommended)
MUET 5040 - Ethnomusicology Studies Abroad
MUET 5050 - Music of Africa
MUET 5060 - African-American Music
MUET 5070 - Studies in Asian Music
MUET 5090 - Music of India
MUET 5210 - Seminar in Ethnomusicology
or 3 hours selected from
the previous list and 3 hours of:
World Music Ensembles (MUEN 5xxx)

Course Requirements (DMA and PhD)

The related field in ethnomusicology requires twelve credit hours. Courses used to fulfill major-field requirements may not be used to fulfill the related-field requirements. Students interested in the related field in ethnomusicology must identify a related-field professor prior to embarking on a program of study.

 
MUET 5030 - Music Cultures of the World
MUET 5220 - Ethnomusicology Field and Research Methods
either 6 hours
selected from:
MUET 5040 - Ethnomusicology Studies Abroad
MUET 5050 - Music of Africa
MUET 5060 - African-American Music
MUET 5070 - Studies in Asian Music
MUET 5090 - Music of India
MUET 5210 - Seminar in Ethnomusicology
or 3 hours selected from
the previous list and 3 hours of:
World Music Ensembles (MUEN 5xxx)